Texas governor signs bill targeting sanctuary cities

via Fox News

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed a bill Sunday prohibiting the state's cities and counties from enacting so-called "sanctuary" laws that prevent local law enforcement officers from inquiring about the immigration status of anyone they detain.

Abbott took the unusual step of signing the bill on Facebook with no advanced public notice. He said Texas residents expect lawmakers to "keep us safe" and said similar laws have already been tested in federal court, where opponents have already been hinting the bill will be immediately challenged.

The timing of the signing caught Democratic lawmakers flatfooted. Democratic state Rep. Cesar Blanco said it looked like Abbott "wanted to get ahead" of any protests surrounding the bill signing. Abbott spokesman John Wittman said they chose to sign the bill on a Facebook livestream because that's "where most people are getting their news nowadays."

Protests over the bill have been intense for months and about 20 people were charged with criminal trespassing last week after staging a daylong sit-in at a state building where some of Abbott's staff works. One Democratic state representative embarked on a three-day hunger strike in protest.

Teri Burke, executive director of the ACLU of Texas, said "we will fight this assault in the court" and the ballot box. Abbott said key provisions of the bill had already been tested at the U.S. Supreme Court, which struck down several components of Arizona's law but allowed the provision permitting police to ask about immigration status.

Republicans say the bill is needed to ensure local jails honor requests from federal officials to keep dangerous offenders behind bars.


AUSTIN, TX -  FEBRUARY 18:  Texas Governor Greg Abbott speaks at a joint press conference February 18, 2015 in Austin, Texas.  The press conference addressed the United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas' decision on the lawsuit filed by a Texas-led coalition of 26 states challenging President Obama's executive action on immigration.  (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)

 

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